2 Parts
11
QUESTIONS

Impact of COVID-19 on the U.S. Real Estate Photographers

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A new RealEstateBees.com survey of over 2,000 active real estate photographers found that despite the negative impact on their business caused by the COVID-19, more than 75% are seeing new opportunities opened by the pandemic.

The following segmented report provides results of a large scale survey—Impact of the Coronavirus on the U.S. Real Estate Businesses—conducted by the Real Estate Bees research team, leading real estate platform for real estate professionals.

The following statistics reflect the situation among the US real estate photographers. We reached out to over 2,000 active real estate photographers from all the 50 U.S. states and Washington D.C. to collect their insight on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the industry in general and their businesses in particular.

The report is divided into the following two parts.

1. Multiple choice questions where the professionals had to choose one of the suggested answers to each question:

1.1 Is there a negative impact the pandemic is having on real estate photographers?
1.2 Has the pandemic opened any unexpected opportunities for real estate photographers?
1.3 How are you adjusting your marketing budget?
1.4 Are you transferring your business to a “work from home” basis?
1.5 Have you noticed any benefits of transferring your business processes to a “work from home” basis?
1.6 Have you noticed any drawbacks of transferring your business to a “work from home” basis?
1.7 Will you keep your business processes transferred to a “work from home” basis after the pandemic is over?

2. Open questions that allowed the experts to share their insights on various aspects of the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the U.S. real estate photographers:

2.1 What are the specific negative impacts the pandemic is having on real estate photographers?
2.2 What unexpected opportunities have the pandemic opened for real estate photographers?
2.3 If you knew the impact of this situation on your business in advance, how would you prepare your business to mitigate your losses or even profit from it?
2.4 What marketing channels do you prefer to use during the pandemic over the rest and why?

Multiple Choice Questions
1
QUESTION

Is there a negative impact the pandemic is having on real estate photographers?

2
QUESTION

Has the pandemic opened any unexpected opportunities for real estate photographers?

3
QUESTION

How are you adjusting your marketing budget?

4
QUESTION

Are you transferring your business to a “work from home” basis?

5
QUESTION

Have you noticed any benefits of transferring your business processes to a “work from home” basis?

6
QUESTION

Have you noticed any drawbacks of transferring your business to a “work from home” basis?

7
QUESTION

Will you keep your business processes transferred to a “work from home” basis after the pandemic is over?

Open Questions
8
QUESTION

What are the specific negative impacts the pandemic is having on real estate photographers?

Key takeaways from the real estate photographers’ answers:

  • The Real Estate Photographers of America & International has reported an immediate reduction of 50% to 80% in business activities since early March, as a result of a significant number of homeowners pulling their homes back from listings. With fewer homes to sell, the number of real estate photography orders has decreased.
  • Some photography companies found it difficult to strike a balance between maintaining quality customer service and protecting their photographers. This was due to conflicting information about safety protocols that were first laid down at the onset of the pandemic.
  • As CDC guidelines on safety had to be followed, photographers found it hard to do their job properly as they were prohibited to move any objects in the property they shoot. This meant having less attractive photos that show homes in their everyday state.
  • It is also a challenge for photographers when agents and occupants don’t comply with social distancing and safety protocol measures. Some photography companies also had to lay off some employees.
  • Should photographers be lucky to get a job, they had to wear added protective gear which meant extra equipment to bring. More established photographers, on the other hand, had lost jobs to newer ones, as clients have turned to cheaper and faster ways to photograph their homes.
  • While there was little to no interior photography jobs for residential real estate, commercial photography, on the other hand, was limited to exterior shots to none at all, as commercial establishments were mostly closed.
  • When lockdown measures were eased in the first week of May, business was still slow as the only areas that were needing photography services were those in the rural areas and locations that were not significantly affected by the pandemic.
  • Photographers also had to adjust their services to accommodate a higher demand for visual marketing.
  • For some photographers, there were no negative impacts, only adjustments that had to be made. This is in terms of being more aware of safety protocols while working.

 

Brent Evans, Sacred Wind Photography, LLC

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Brent Evans Real Estate Photographer

When speaking of negative impacts on real estate photographers, I would have to say that, compared to other industries and other individuals, there are no negative impacts, only adjustments that have to be made.

I say this because people are dying, loved ones are grieving, and many people are economically stressed but I am not experiencing any of this and to call any of what I am experiencing “negative” would be trite and disrespectful to those who are truly suffering.

Adjustments include not shaking hands, having masks and gloves ready for the sellers/realtors who request them, and taking 5 to 10 minutes to thoroughly sanitize one’s self and one’s equipment after every job.

 

Matt Robnett, Plush Image Corporation

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Matt Robnett Real Estate Photographer

We had to downsize our staff, which actually worked out well because we had some bad attitudes we wanted to deal with.

One challenge has been getting agents and occupants to take social distancing and safety protocols seriously. We’ve tried slapping our temporary rules everywhere, taking credit card info upfront to penalize offenders. No matter what we do, it hasn’t made a difference and has placed us in some awkward situations.

But I’ve let my staff make the decisions about what to do all along the way. Their safety and comfort is my first priority, and making sure we aren’t contributing to the spread of COVID-19 is of the highest importance as well.

 

Dave Hall, 360-Media, Property Imaging Experts

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Dave Hall Real Estate Photographer

The COVID-19 impact has affected my business both positively and negatively. Overall sales are down 18-20% YTD. However, the pandemic has actually increased my customer base. There is no question that my regular 400 or so real estate agents are seeing less volume. I hear it from their lips and I see it in their volume or orders.

But, with social distancing, real estate agents are putting value and emphasis on their online digital presentation of the property. Additionally, we have seen interest in our 360 virtual tours such as Matterport, which increased substantially. When the nation makes it to the other side of COVID-19, I think my business will be stronger than before the pandemic.

 

Angi Landis, Angi’s Art LLC

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Angi Landis Real Estate Photographer

During quarantine, the little bit of business I did get was different. At the time, I was no longer met at the house by the real estate agent. A 4-digit lockbox was left at empty houses with keys in them. This made it difficult for some of the agents because they like to use the iboxes, but as a small photo business, I had no way to access those because I didn’t want to pay the license fee.

When things started to open back up, the real estate agents were able to meet me at the houses, but now I had to be aware of the 6-foot distance from people, wear a mask (which fogged up while photographing), and use a hand sanitizer after touching any surfaces.

 

Alan Blakely, Alan Blakely Architectural Photography

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Alan Blakely Real Estate Photographer

Most real estate photographers have seen a significant reduction in business since early March. As the director of Real Estate Photographers of America & International, I can report that our membership saw an immediate loss of 50% to 80% of their normal business.

For those photographers who rely solely on real estate photography for their income, the impact has been devastating. Since the first week of May, some of our members have been reporting a steady but slow increase in business. The uptick in business began first in the more rural areas of the country and those areas that were not significantly impacted by the pandemic.

 

Kate Carter, Vermont Real Estate Photography

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Kate Carter Real Estate Photographer

There was a big pause in March and April while people tried to figure out what was going on. Naturally there was a drop in activity and revenue. We are lucky to live in Vermont where our governor has been very cautious and thoughtful. One of the first industries to come back on board after the quarantine was real estate.

There were some very specific protocols to follow and people — buyers, sellers, agents, and contractors — were very good about being careful, wearing masks, and using hand sanitizers. People were cautious, but hopeful, and it appears we are now coming out of the slump.

 

Eugenia Lubrano-Gangi, NOLA Real Estate Marketing

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Eugenia Lubrano-Gangi Real Estate Photographer

The hardest thing is maintaining the level of customer service in person while protecting our photographers. In the beginning, there had been conflicting information and no clear direction in terms of closures and stay-at-home orders as they apply to our business.

Once our role was established as a service that could remain open, it was up to us to protect ourselves and others while working in the field. The second challenge was pivoting our services to accommodate a higher demand for visual marketing as homeowners were more reluctant to have showings at their homes.

 

James Fuqua, James Fuqua Photography

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James Fuqua Real Estate Photographer

Of course, the most noticeable impact is the reluctance of having more people than necessary visiting the property; this has had a push for realtors to take photos themselves. Between this and people holding off on selling their houses, it is leading to less work overall for real estate photographers.

Another impact which could be considered a negative and a positive is the wearing of added PPE (gloves and mask). I always wore shoe covers to protect the floor (in some situations, to protect my shoes), but now there are just a few extra pieces of equipment to be mindful of.

 

Jaime Garza, Sharp Frame Media

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Jaime Garza Real Estate Photographer

We have seen a significant pullback in the number of homes being put on the market. Active listings were down in Dallas, Collin, and Denton counties by double digits during April. We have heard from multiple of our realtor clients that they have had potential homeowners pull back from wanting to sell a home right now.

One realtor had a client that was working for a major airline and was laid off due to pandemic and couldn’t move forward with upgrading their home. All this translates to fewer homes to photograph and a decline in business.

 

Mark Skalny, Mark Skalny Photography

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Mark Skalny Real Estate Photographer

I would have to say that there isn’t an industry that hasn’t been touched by COVID-19. Real estate agents and home builders are still working hard to sell and build homes. And these homes need to be captured in the best light possible.

Therefore, the need for professional photographers is there, but for many of the mid- to low-price-point homes, clients are finding cheaper, faster ways to photograph these homes just to showcase them on MLS.

 

Joey Ungerer, Key Lime Photography

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Joey Ungerer Real Estate Photographer

The COVID-19 pandemic has certainly affected our residential real estate clientele. Home listings will always need real estate photography, no matter what shape the economy is in. However, during the spring months of this year, agents tended to opt for the novice-tier photographers as photography budgets waned.

This can be good for photographers who are building a portfolio, but not great for photographers with experience and top-grade equipment.

 

Matt Harmon, Harmon Property Solutions

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Matt Harmon Real Estate Photographer

There is a general loss of activity for us of around 30% to 40%, compared to where we were in February and early March. One of the other negative impacts is that due to our inability to touch things in homes, we end up shooting homes with a little more clutter than we would normally accept.

Things like broken blinds, trashcans, personal items in bathrooms – we are 100% avoiding touching some of these things we might have touched and worked with in the past.

 

David Filipi, Wild Dog Digital

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David Filipi Real Estate Photographer

Our workflow has changed a little bit, thanks to the need of wearing protective equipment in order to minimize the chances of being a spreader. Also reschedules and cancellations happen more often because sellers are nervous and uncertain if they want to sell.

From the business perspective, we see fewer homes being listed, but agents order more add-on services like videos or 3D virtual tours.

 

Bill Horsman, Bill Horsman Photography

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Bill Horsman Real Estate Photographer

Unable to schedule any type of interior photography. Residents obviously want to minimize intrusions into their homes, and commercial businesses have largely been closed. I’ve been able to shoot a few commercial exteriors, but with most developers and commercial brokerage firms closed, no one is moving forward with any type of work, photography or otherwise.

9
QUESTION

What unexpected opportunities has the pandemic opened for real estate photographers?

Key takeaways from the real estate photographers’ answers:

  • Photographers are now being hired to develop virtual tours, virtual stagings, interactive floor plans, and walkthrough videos to replace in-person property visits in adherence to the stay-at-home orders.
  • Additional services are being provided to make listed properties more online-friendly. Photographers are helping build dedicated websites and develop social media-optimized content to make property showing easily accessible to social media users.
  • Photographers have also ventured into real estate consultations to help agents improve their online reach.
  • Photographers have also seen additional job opportunities from builders who prefer to have a photoshoot of their model and spec homes during the pandemic when these models are closed to the public.
  • Some photographers believe they have become more efficient workers during the pandemic as homes become more photo-ready as well. They expect to see this kind of home readiness as well as new policies to be implemented when the pandemic is over.
  • The pandemic has also opened doors for photographers to be more creative in marketing their services. Some have emphasized safety as part of their services to put clients at ease.
  • Photographers believe the pandemic provided an opportune time to reassess the business and look at some areas that needed to be changed.

 

John Moery, John Moery Photography

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John Moery Real Estate Photographer

This pandemic has really pushed the real estate market to embrace current technologies like 360º virtual walkthrough tours as well as floor plans. Since Zillow started offering their 3D tours directly on their site, this has opened the doors to a new marketing method that is readily available and also dramatically increased the marketing exposure of properties on the Zillow platform.

This is one of the first stops for many potential buyers in their house hunting search, so having a virtual tour platform that is directly embedded in it and also boosts search results for properties that have 3D tours has been a big deal. With the pandemic, the 360º degree tours have become the new norm.

 

Edouard Zakarian, Edouard Zak Photography

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Edouard Zakarian Real Estate Photographer

The COVID-19 environment has expedited the demand and acceptance of next-generation property marketing technologies. Virtual platforms like Matterport for 3D virtual tours have been around for a few years, but cost-conscious realtors and technology-averse sellers/buyers have tempered the space.

Now, pre-qualifying prospective buyers taking such tours prior to physical walkthroughs have opened up a new revenue stream to service providers. I believe entrepreneurs will develop more virtual opportunities for photographers and videographers in the coming years.

 

Charlie Taylor, Snap2Close Real Estate Photography

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Charlie Taylor - Real Estate Photographer

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we moved into the world of 3Dvirtual tours and interactive floor plans. While the $3,000 USD cost for the Matterport 3D camera was significant, it paid for itself in less than 4 weeks.

We also had lots of clients very interested in our interactive floor plan service. While it took a bit longer to develop the software than anticipated, it was well worth the investment. Since launching these services, our business has significantly increased.

 

Kyle O’Boyle, VRX Media Group

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Kyle O'Boyle Real Estate Photographer

We are seeing a large uptick in interest and orders for Matterport 3D tours because of the stay-at-home orders across the US. This has increased orders nearly 20% across the nation for our photographers with our Matterport 3D tour with free professional photography packages.

We have also noticed an increase in orders from the commercial real estate and apartment/property management sectors looking for Matterport 3D, interior video, and even virtual staging.

 

James Fuqua, James Fuqua Photography

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James Fuqua Real Estate Photographer

The only thing that has opened up is an extra marketing opportunity to set myself apart. The coronavirus is here and we can’t change that, so we might as well embrace it.

I have put an emphasis that part of what I offer customers is the peace of mind that I follow the CDC guidelines and wear gloves, mask, and shoe covers to protect their property and anyone who is coming in after me. Their health is my number one concern.

 

Mike Leonardi, Candidly Yours Photography

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Mike Leonardi Real Estate Photographer

I think there are two ways to look at anything that happens: open your mind to change and opportunities or sit back and mope. Personally, the pandemic has allowed me to think about the business and realize that there are some things that I needed to change.

It also made me realize that there are other ways to assist in showing the real estate listings like through videography and virtual 360º tours.

 

Matt Harmon, Harmon Property Solutions

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Matt Harmon Real Estate Photographer

We are realizing how much more efficient we are, and how much more our photographers can focus on the art of photography when the homes are 100% ready when we arrive. Having an agent or seller managing the shoot usually diminishes creativity and increases time onsite. We are hoping to come out of this pandemic with some new policies on home readiness!

 

Kamil Banc, ANC Media LLC

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Kamil Banc Real Estate Photographer

We have added additional services that make it easier for our clients to show their listed properties online. Some of those services include dedicated property websites as well as social media-optimized content that works better on platforms like Instagram and Facebook. We also started consulting some agents on how to improve their reach online.

 

Ryan Hansen, Hapi Photography

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Ryan Hansen Real Estate Photographer

We are getting hired more to create walkthrough videos as well as much more virtual tours. We also noticed floor plan sales have skyrocketed. We have been breaking records this past six weeks in sales. It may not be from the COVID-19 but by our customer service and the quality of work we deliver to our clients.

 

Nate Hughes, Look2 Home Marketing

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Nate Hughes Real Estate Photographer

We have seen a large increase in the number of orders from builders during this crisis with most of their models closed to the public. These orders are not just for model homes but also for spec homes.

10
QUESTION

If you knew the impact of this situation on your business in advance, how would you prepare your business to mitigate your losses or even profit from it?

Key takeaways from the real estate photographers’ answers:

  • Strengthening relationships with agents and brokerages, as well as other potential clients, through targeted branding campaigns would have given photographers a headstart in marketing their alternative virtual solutions, video tours, aerial photography, and property websites as the next big thing in photography in the time of pandemic.
  • Some photographers believe providing more options for virtual tours could have helped set them apart. This could have helped educate customers about the right virtual tour to avail.
  • Training additional photographers will promote better business growth to keep up with the increased demand for photography services. On the other hand, hiring more photographers and editors can help meet the demand faster and more efficiently.
  • Expanding services to cater to other clients, such as those in commercial real estate, would have given photographers more income opportunities.
  • Photographers could have also ventured into coaching services for agents as a means to gain more income, while helping agents reach their full potential.
  • Tightening the purse strings would have been a smart move to cushion the impact of business loss during the pandemic.
  • It would have been a wise move to educate customers earlier on the changes that will take place in terms of providing safer services. Stocking up on protective equipment and disinfecting items could have also been done.
  • With working from home becoming the new norm, it would have helped if photographers had prepped their teams to be ready for this kind of work setup.

 

Kyle O’Boyle, VRX Media Group

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Kyle O'Boyle Real Estate Photographer

We were well positioned for the pandemic as the nation’s fastest-growing real estate media service provider and one of the top Matterport 3D service providers in the US. With that said, during the pandemic and currently, we wish more agents and brokerages knew about our affordable packages and online booking before things escalated the way they did.

This is making us focus on targeted branding campaigns and looking to aggressively form relationships with brokerages and real estate tech companies, so more real estate professionals know what VRX Media can provide and how much time and money our media services provide.

 

Stephanie Pierce, SPierce Photography

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Stephanie Pierce Real Estate Photographer

I honestly don’t think I’d change anything. Ethically, I wouldn’t want to be profiting from the pandemic at all: it just feels dirty to me (again, this is a personal ethics/preference thing). And, like anything else, save as much as you can during the good times to prepare for the bad ones.

There’s no way anyone won’t be affected by this one way or another, though. Even if they had savings, those savings are gone or close to it. And those people are going to have to work to rebuild those savings.

 

Edouard Zakarian, Edouard Zak Photography

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Edouard Zakarian Real Estate Photographer

Investing in the training of additional photographers would have enabled more growth. There is a physical bottleneck in photography as one photographer can only service a limited number of clients per day. Currently, expanding work hours, including weekends, is necessary to keep up with the increased demand of additional service per call.

 

Jaime Garza, Sharp Frame Media

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Jaime Garza Real Estate Photographer

I would have aimed to grow other aspects of the business: retail shops, commercial buildings, and small businesses. They have a need for photos and video to market themselves during this pandemic. So if we knew beforehand what was coming, we could have helped them get ahead of the messaging and have a polished online presence.

 

Matt Harmon, Harmon Property Solutions

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Matt Harmon Real Estate Photographer

I wish I would have had more options for virtual tours ready to go. We have a few, but there are a few product lines I wish we’d had ready. The phrase “virtual tour” means different things to different agents, so we’re currently trying to help define that for folks since most agents seem to want something they can call a virtual tour right now.

 

Dave Koch, Real Estate Photography Utah

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Dave Koch Real Estate Photographer

I think we all would have saved more. I think I would have stressed other areas of my business. But by and large, as real estate photographers, we have been very lucky. We have been able to keep working, even if not as much. Good customer service helps us keep our clients, and now that is important.

 

James Fuqua, James Fuqua Photography

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James Fuqua Real Estate Photographer

I would have stocked up on gloves and sanitizing wipes. Other than that, I would have educated my customers earlier on how my business is going to take protective measures, so at the beginning they would not have had concerns of me entering their properties to take the photos.

 

Alan Blakely, Alan Blakely Architectural Photography

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Alan Blakely Real Estate Photographer

I believe that I would have been extremely conservative financially in the months leading up to this pandemic in order to have more “cushion” when business dropped off. I honestly don’t believe that there was an opportunity for increasing business and profiting from this situation.

 

Mark Dean, Galaxy Media

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Mark Dean Real Estate Photographer

I probably would have pushed our service that has been most helpful for people at this time – virtual tours. Since clients can’t see homes in person, virtual tours allow you to do a virtual walkthrough of the home without seeing it in person.

 

Bobby Cockerille, HD Bros – Real Estate Photo and Video

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Bobby Cockerille Real Estate Photographer

We would have been hiring more photographers and editors had we known what was coming. Availability and quick delivery is key in our business, so the more team members we have available, the more clients we can serve.

 

Kamil Banc, ANC Media LLC

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Kamil Banc Real Estate Photographer

We would have promoted more coaching services for individual agents. This is a field that is being discussed a lot but in practice, many agents still miss out on the opportunity and do not reach their fullest potential.

 

Travis Turner, Travis M Turner Photography

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Travis Turner Real Estate Photographer

I would make sure any potential clients were aware of all of the services that I offer beyond standard photography (virtual tours, video, aerial, property websites, etc).

 

Jason LaVanture, Real Tour Vision – RTV, Inc.

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Jason LaVanture Real Estate Photographer

We would have prepped the team to work from home more efficiently. We’re all working on a VPN at this time, but it was an adjustment for our staff.

11
QUESTION

What marketing channels do you prefer to use during the pandemic over the rest and why?

Key takeaways from the real estate photographers’ answers:

  • Social media channels like Facebook and Instagram are being harnessed heavily during the pandemic as more people are on these platforms these days and provide a good opportunity for photographers to showcase their work in the most creative and accessible way possible.
  • Video sharing platforms like YouTube and Vimeo are also being utilized as these have proven to be easier channels to promote services and products.
  • Company websites have also been revamped to include virtual options for showing houses.
  • Zillow is also used to boost search and harness effective 3D tours as a marketing tool.
  • Apart from reaching customers online, getting in touch with them personally or through phone calls remains an effective method to use to communicate about safe operating procedures and reinforce confidence between photographers and their clients.
  • Some heavy users of social media tools for advertising have found that word-of-mouth referrals and face-to-face encounters during real estate events are still more effective in capturing new clients. For this demographic, building a strong relationship within the community they serve is the best part of the business.
  • Marketing also takes the form of educating clients during the pandemic, as photographers take advantage of webinars and email marketing as methods to help answer their pressing questions about matters that affect the industry.
  • Print materials like flyers are also being harnessed to notify clients about new safety protocols that are being enforced during the pandemic.
  • Some photographers turn to their network of agents as a way to market their services.

 

Brad Capone, Capone Photography

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Brad Capone Real Estate Photographer

I’ve dramatically increased my YouTube marketing and content since the beginning of COVID-19. I feel video in the real estate industry is what professional photography was to the industry in 2005. It’s still not mainstream, but you’re seeing more and more of it and there’s no question that this is what consumers want.

YouTube, still being the second most used search engine in the USA, is still very underappreciated in the real estate industry in 2020. The lack of competition on this platform allows me to generally rank high quickly for my keyword goals and my content is easily shared on other platforms quickly.

 

Brent Evans, Sacred Wind Photography, LLC

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Brent Evans Real Estate Photographer

Over the course of our business, we’ve seen that advertising has little to no ROI. This includes things like Yelp, Google Ads, SEO, online ads, etc. Ninety-nine percent of all our leads come through face-to-face encounters as well and word-of-mouth referrals between realtors and brokers.

Pretty much any form of advertising is worthless to us except face-to-face encounters with potential clients in chambers of commerce, trade shows, etc. But this is the best part of our business – the community and relationships it has brought. These are priceless. As for all of the above, I’d say nothing has changed with regards to marketing.

 

John Moery, John Moery Photography

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John Moery Real Estate Photographer

For my own personal business, I still depend on organic web searches and SEO optimization to push other local businesses to my website, but my biggest marketing tool are the agents I have done work for and who share my name with others. This is where I get about 90% of my business.

For marketing of properties, I really suggest to my agents to embrace Zillow for what it has to offer. Take advantage of their search boosting by always having 3D tours done on the Zillow platform as well as offer floor plans as this is one of the biggest things potential buyers want. New technology in the floor plan space has made the creation of them nearly trivial and also very inexpensive.

 

Wendy Whittemore, Aerial Innovations Southeast

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Wendy Whittemore Real Estate Photographer

We have remained firm, if not increased, our touch points via social media. In the midst of the shutdown, we pulled back on email marketing as we felt there was enough communication about COVID flying into inboxes, so we didn’t need to be a part of that noise.

Since then, we have moved more towards video marketing. Our goal is to provide education of services and industry topics in weekly in-house produced videos for clients to utilize as they adjust their processes and adapt to potentially limited resources.

 

Alan Blakely, Alan Blakely Architectural Photography

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Alan Blakely Real Estate Photographer

Social media is the go-to marketing channel for real estate photographers. However in this unique situation, we find that reaching out to photography buyers personally is proving to be most effective. Perhaps the ability to offer personal assurance about safe operating procedures provides photography buyers with a greater level of confidence.

Many photographers are finding that a simple phone call is the first step to getting business back on track with real estate agents and other photography buyers.

 

Len Catalanotto, Len Catalanotto Photography

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Len Catalanotto Real Estate Photographer

I actually did the opposite. I rarely pay for any advertising if ever, but usually post something in my neighborhood Facebook page on Wednesdays. That’s the day they allow small businesses to advertise.

I haven’t done a lot of that since March, only because I know some people are not doing well and I felt that staying quiet would be fine. I was making more money so I didn’t feel the need. I’ve had my two biggest months back-to-back since I’ve been to Arizona for April and May.

 

Bobby Cockerille, HD Bros – Real Estate Photo and Video

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Bobby Cockerille Real Estate Photographer

We are big Instagram and Facebook users already. The pandemic has only increased our usage of these platforms and our ability to use organic content to drive traction to our pages.

Almost everyone is on these platforms for personal use at this point. They may even have a business page as well to help capture additional audience members that way and with folks living through their devices more than ever, it’s a prime opportunity to show what you can do.

 

Kyle O’Boyle, VRX Media Group

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Kyle O'Boyle Real Estate Photographer

The two that we have been finding the most success from are through our email marketing and webinars (free webinars running on our website daily).

In both channels we are pushing education, answering questions like what the new normal of real estate selling will look like and why real estate professionals should use Matterport 3D and interior video during and after the pandemic.

 

Mark Skalny, Mark Skalny Photography

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Mark Skalny Real Estate Photographer

Everything and anything to keep the work out there. But I mainly use LinkedIn, Instagram, Google, and direct marketing. My market is business-to-business, and I find these platforms work the best. And even in a pandemic, there is nothing better than face-to-face (even on a Zoom call) or hearing someone’s voice on the phone. Making that personal connection is key.

 

Jared Hoffpauir, Jared Hoffpauir Photography

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Jared Hoffpauir -Real Estate Photographer

I still prefer social media marketing over anything else these days and especially during the pandemic. Luckily, in our area, realtors are considered essential business so we are still able to team up with our loyal agent partners to aid in the quick sale of each property. The market is hot right now and listings are selling within a week or less, it’s crazy times for sure.

 

Stephanie Pierce, SPierce Photography

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Stephanie Pierce Real Estate Photographer

My marketing strategies haven’t changed. I have my website, an Instagram account, and a listing in the yellow pages, but that’s it. Until we get a better read on the market or where our niches are, I’m not sure I’d recommend a photographer to change their marketing strategies yet. It’s mainly a “wait and see” situation.

 

Charlie Taylor, Snap2Close Real Estate Photography

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Charlie Taylor - Real Estate Photographer

We primarily rely on direct emails via Constant Contact and our website. We rank number one on Google for the search term “real estate photography”. We also recently revamped our website and created dedicated web pages for Matterport 3D tours.

 

Greg Busby, BuzzHome Productions

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Greg Busby Real Estate Photographer

I prefer to use Vimeo to host our video walkthrough tours as they do not have ads and you can turn off the suggested videos to watch at the end. This allows me to share my work with less distraction and more attention to the product I’m promoting.

 

Kristi Foster, Kristi Foster Photography, Inc.

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Kristi Foster Real Estate Photographer

I tend to get new business from agents I already work with by sharing my name and contact details. I use my email list to send out newsletters to keep them up-to-date on my services.

 

Art Moreno, Jr., MLS Camera Guy

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Art Moreno Jr. Real Estate Photographer

A detailed flyer is sent to all customers as part of my company’s protocol to ensure the safety of the property’s occupants (if any) as well as the photographer.

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